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Marijuana can help heal broken bones, study says

By Oscar Pascual |

Chalk up yet another ailment that medical marijuana benefits: broken bones.

Researchers from Tel Aviv University and Hebrew University administered doses of marijuana’s main compounds THC and CBD to rats with broken femurs over a period of 18 weeks, and found that the rodents’ bones repaired significantly faster, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

“We found that CBD alone makes bones stronger during healing, enhancing the maturation of the collagenous matrix, which provides the basis for new mineralization of bone tissue,” Dr. Yankel Gabet, of the Bone Research Laboratory in the Department of Anatomy and Anthropology at Tel Aviv University, said in a press release. “After being treated with CBD, the healed bone will be harder to break in the future.”

Researchers tested CBD alone on the rats, as well as a combination of both THC and CBD. They found that CBD alone was just as effective over an eight-week time-frame than administering both THC and CBD.

Gabet says that the human body houses its own cannabinoid system that regulates both vital and non-vital systems. It’s the reason why both the psychogenic compound THC and CBD both have a major effect on human brain and body system.

“The clinical potential of cannabinoid-related compounds is simply undeniable at this point,” Gabet said. “While there is still a lot of work to be done to develop appropriate therapies, it is clear that it is possible to detach a clinical therapy objective from the psychoactivity of cannabis. CBD, the principal agent in our study, is primarily anti-inflammatory and has no psychoactivity.”

The study’s authors believe that there should now be an ongoing effort to research the medical benefits of CBD.

“Other studies have also shown CBD to be a safe agent, which leads us to believe we should continue this line of study in clinical trials to assess its usefulness in improving human fracture healing,” said Gabet.

Photo credit: Flickr.com/k9d